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Cole James

Male 1600 - 1678


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  • Name  Cole James 
    Born  25 Jul 1600  Highgate, London, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender  Male 
    Died  Oct 1678  Plymouth, Plymouth, MA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried  Plymouth, MA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • He was the Innkeeper of Plymouth Colony.

      Also a shoemaker, sailor, surveyor

      http://www.geni.com/people/James-Cole/6000000007397061231
    • Birth: James Coles was born about 1600 based on the date of
      his marriage.
      Death: He died after October 1678.
      Ship: Unknown, 1633
      Life in England: Nothing is known of his life in England.
      Life in New England: James Cole?s name first appears in the
      Plymouth records in the 1633 list of freemen. He served on a
      number of juries, as a constable for Plymouth and as a surveyor
      of highways. He apparently followed several trades, being
      described in the court records as a sailor (1638) shoemaker
      (1661) and innkeeper (many references). James Cole appeared
      many times in Plymouth records for either being drunk or
      allowing others to become drunk in his house.
      Family: James Cole married Mary Tibbes in Barnstaple,
      Devonshire on May 1, 1625, and had four children. She died
      after March 7, 1659/60.
      Children of James and Mary Cole:
      ? James was baptized in Barnstaple on February 11. 1626/7. He
      married (1) Mary Tilson on December 23, 1652, and had
      seven children. He married (2) Esther _____ by September
      1698. He married (3) Abigail _____ in 1700 or later. He died
      on October 4, 1709.
      ? Hugh was baptized on June 29, 1628, in Barnstaple. He married
      Mary Foxwell in Plymouth on January 8, 1654/5, and
      had twelve children. He died in 1699. John was born about
      1630. He may be the man whose inventory was taken at
      Portsmouth, Rhode Island, on December 15, 1676. If so, he
      had a wife named Mary.
      ? Mary was born about 1632. She married (1) John Almy by
      1668 and (2) John Pococke by June 28, 1677. She had no
      known children.


      James Cole (son of James Cole) was born 25 Jul 1600 in St. Giles, Cripplegate, Highland, London, England, and died 31 Jan 1697 in Plymouth, Plymouth County, MA. He married Mary Tibbes on 08 May 1625 in Barnstaple, England, daughter of John Tybbs and Margaret Harris.

      Includes NotesNotes for James Cole:
      James and Mary Cole came to Saco, Maine, in 1632, and the following year, 1633,locate in Plymouth, MA, where he was admitted as freeman the same year. He wasknown as a sailor. His name appears upon the tax list of Plymouth in 1634; Jan. 2, 1636, he had a grant of ten acres of land; Jan. 2, 1637, the court deeded him seven acres of land to belong to his dwelling house. Three acres of land probably included all the land on the south side of Leydon Street, from the corner of Warren Street to the westerly line of the lot opposite the Universalist Church. He was the first settler of and lived upon what is still known as "Cole'sHill," the first burial ground of the Pilgrims. Soon after his arrival at Plymouth he opened the first inn or public house of Plymouth, and one of, it not the first, public house in New England. Merchant was an occupation that might mean anything involving the buying and selling of a variety of products. An occupation of considerable importance was that of innkeeper, for the state recognizedthe need to provide comfortable lodging, food, and drink
      for visitors. James Cole became Plymouth's best known innkeeper with his establishment on Cole's Hill on the north side of Leyden Street. His worth to the community was shown in 1669 when the court awarded him 10 pounds to repair his house "soe as it may bee fitted as an ordinary for the entertainment of strangers."

      James Cole was born in England. He migrated to Plymouth as an adult with his wife Mary and their 4 children. James Cole first appears in the records of Plymouth Colony in the 1630s. The name of the ship on which he sailed to America is not known. Jameswas an innkeeper. Operating an inn, or "ordinary," was a public service and the Colony authorized money to keep the ordinary in good repair. James also appears in the Records of Plymouth Colony for violations of the Colony?s liquor lawson numerous occasions. James Cole?s ordinary was near but not actually on Plymouth?s "Coles Hill." Coles Hill most probably takes its name, not from James Cole, but from John Cole who bought property on the hill in 1697. The first reference to "Coles Hill" appears on 6 March 1698-9 : "The towne granted to Nathaniel Warren 50 foot frunt of land below Coles Hill soe aled by the shore side and soe to Run down from High Water Marke in to the sea to whorf out soe farr as may be
      Convenient the sd Warren alwayes leaveing A sufficient way for Carts to pass along the shore between the banck & the sd land to be taken upp" (Records of the Town of Plymouth, I : 266). The date of James Cole?s death is unknown, helast appears in the records in 1673.

      More About James Cole:
      Immigration: 1632, Saco, Maine.
      Occupation: Plymouth, MA; Occupation: Sailor, Inn Keeper.
      Residence: 1633, Plymouth, MA.

      More About James Cole and Mary Tibbes:
      Marriage: 08 May 1625, Barnstaple, England.

      Children of James Cole and Mary Tibbes are:
      +Hugh Cole, b. 28 Jun 1628, Barnstable, Devonshire, England, d. 22 Jan 1698, Swansea, Bristol County, MA.
      James Cole, b. 1626, Barnstaple, England.
      John Cole, b., Barnstaple, Devonshire, England.

      James Cole, his wife and children arrived in Plymouth sometime prior to 1633, when he was listed as a freeman. He has been called a sailor, a shoemaker and an innkeeper. He also was a surveyor of highways, served on several juries and was a constable for Plymouth. He must have had some education to be considered reliable for these positions. The land that became known as Cole?s Hill, was first known as Burial Hill. This is where it is said the Pilgrims buried their dead that first winter, 1621, so the Indians would not be aware that their numbers had dropped by half. There are many entries in the records of Plymouth concerning James as an innkeeper. He had many difficulties with the laws of Plymouth. He was fined for allowing people to become drunk, for selling spirits on the Sabbath, for selling spirits to the Indians and for being drunk himself. He lost his license to operate his tavern, but he continued to run his inn regardless. He was obviously a colorful figure in Plymouth society.

      In 1670 his tavern was succeeded by his son James, Jr. The business operated smoothly after that as James, Jr. stayed well within the regulations set forth by the Plymouth magistrates.

      Today, Coles Hill has a roadside marker and other memorials to him and the Pilgrims. It faces Plymouth Rock and the Ocean. It was a good vantage point for seeing any approaching vessels bent on doing harm to them. One of the memorials says:
      "In memory of James Cole
      Born London England 1600
      Died Plymouth Mass 1692
      First settler of Coles Hill 1633
      A soldier in Pequot Indian War 1637
      This tablet erected by his descendants1917"

      According to Pilgrim Hall Museum, America's Museum of Pilgrim Possession, virtually all the historic sites relating to the earliest period of the settlement at Plymouth in 1620 have lost their original character and convey little impression of the colony. One exception is Cole's Hill. The view from the hill of land and harbor and sea conveys a vivid impression of the scene that greeted the Mayflower's weary passengers.

      The hill was the traditional burial place of the Plymouth colonists, Pilgrims, and others, who died during the tragic first winter of 1620-21. The dead were reportedly buried at night, and their graves disguised to prevent the Indians from learning the dangerously weakened state of the survivors. In later years, the colonists occasionally mounted cannons on the hill to ward off possible attack from the sea.

      Today, Cole's Hill is maintained by the Pilgrim Society as a public park. On its top stands the memorial to the Mayflower Pilgrims. At the foot of the hill is Plymouth Rock, the legendary landing site of the Pilgrims and stepping stone to the New World. Whether or not the Pilgrims actually landed on the rock, it has deep meaning for most Americans. Cole's Hill, the nearby rock, and the curving shores of Plymouth Bay memorably evoke the time more than three centuries past when Englishmen came to the shores of New England to stay.
    • The earliest information obtained of James Cole, whose name stands at the head of the family in America, dates from 1616, when he was living at Highgate, a suburb of London, England. He is spoken of as a great lover of flowers.

      According to Robert C. Anderson: James Coles was born about 1600 based on the date of his marriage. He died after October 1678. Ship: Unknown, 1633. Nothing is known of his life in England.

      James and Mary may have come to Saco, Maine, in 1632[2]. He was listed in the 1632 census, page 253, for Plymouth, MA. though 1633 is used as the year of immigration. He was admitted as freeman the same year[3]. His name appears upon the tax list of Plymouth in 1634; Jan. 2, 1636, he had a grant of ten acres of land; Jan. 2, 1637, the court deeded him seven acres of land to belong to his dwelling house. Three acres of land probably included all the land on the south side of Leyden Street, from the corner of Warren Street to the westerly line of the lot opposite the Universalist Church. His dwelling stood on the lot next below the Baptist Church. He was the first settler who lived on "Cole's Hill", as it is still known, the first burial ground of the Pilgrims. This land probably included the ground upon which rests Plymouth Rock. He had several grants of land thereafter. In September, 1641, he had a grant of fifty acres of land at Lakenham meadow. In October, 1642, he had a further grant of 1and at the same place. In 1662 a grant of land at Sacconet Neck. In 1665 he had thirty acres of land on the west side of the Namuet River. He was surveyor of highways in 1641, 42, 51, and 52; was constable in 1641 and 1644; and served on a number of juries. In 1637 his name appears upon a list of volunteers against the Pequot Indians.[4]. In 1668 he sold most of his land to his son, James. In 1689 his son, James, Jr., sold it to William Shurtliffe.

      Trades and Tavern Ownership

      He apparently followed several trades, being described in the court records as a sailor (1638) shoemaker (1661) and innkeeper (many references). He opened the first inn in Plymouth in house owned by Edward Winslow, formerly owned by William Brewster in the center of town. James Cole appeared many times in Plymouth records for either being drunk or allowing others to become drunk in his house. Of particular interest is James Cole's apparent lack of church membership among the scores of early prominent settlers whose places of prominence in the community were usually paralleled by leadership roles within the church. Not only did James Cole appear to avoid church, but also operated a rather rowdy tavern. A later account describes the throwing of stools and general disturbance until early morning hours.

      George F. Willison in "Saints and Strangers", Phx Libr 974.4 c117mo2, on page 346, indicates: "James Cole soon opened an ordinary on Cole's Hill, just above Plymouth Rock, later removing his casks and bottles to more ample quarters in Winslow's house, formerly Brewster's, conveniently situated in the very center of town at the corner of the street and the highway."

      In September, 1640, the following order was passed: "James Cole of Plymouth is prohibited to draw any wine or strong water until the next term of the General Court, and not then without special license from the court." No reason is given for the passing of this order, and the privilege of selling liquors was given to another person until 1645. Because of the inconvenience to travelers in having no liquor to be sold at the inn, the above order was rescinded. A very colorful history of his tavern operations is given at http://www.arq.net/~ljacobs/cole.html. James continued to operate an inn even without his liquor license. He was apparently financially successful and acted as surety on bonds at various times and loaned money. He undoubtedly won the respect of the townspeople. James Cole also appeared numerous times in court records as either plaintiff or defendant in various actions involving business contracts and debt collections.

      On October 2, 1650 he was presented by the Grand Jury for assault and battery, but he was acquitted. On June 7, 1657, the court granted to him ten pounds for the repair of his inn. "The court having given unto James Cole of Plymouth the sum of ten pounds towards repairing the house he now liveth in, so that it may be fitted for an Ordinary, for the entertainment of strangers." In 1659 the court again paid Cole 10 pounds for improvements in his "ordinary."

      In 1654 his boat was pressed for an expedition against the Dutch, but the plan was abandoned.

      Family and Children

      James Cole married Mary Tibbes in Barnstaple, Devonshire on May 1, 1625, and had four children. She died after March 7, 1659/60. Children of James and Mary Cole:

      1. James was baptized in Barnstaple on February 11. 1626/7. He married (1) Mary Tilson on December 23, 1652, and had seven children. He married (2) Esther _____ by September 1698. He married (3) Abigail _____ in 1700 or later. He died on October 4, 1709.
      2. Hugh was baptized on June 29, 1628, in Barnstaple. He married Mary Foxwell in Plymouth on January 8, 1654/5, and had twelve children. He died in 1699. John was born about 1630. He may be the man whose inventory was taken at Portsmouth, Rhode Island, on December 15, 1676. If so, he had a wife named Mary.
      3? John
      4. Mary was born about 1632. She married (1) John Almy by 1668 and (2) John Pococke by June 28, 1677. She had no known children.
      According to the "Truth about the Pilgrims" by Francis R. Stoddard, Phx Libr 973.22 st63t, the James Cole who was born in 1629 was the father of Joanna Cole who married Thomas Howland, (a grandson of John Howland, passenger on the Mayflower) and their son, Consider Howland, inherited his grandfather's inn (Cole's Inn), when his father, James 1629, died in 1709.

      Virkis "Compendium of American Genealogy, Vol II" Phx Libr 929.10923 v764a shows: "Cole, James, born 1600 from Eng. to Saco, Me 1632; settled at "Cole's Hill", Plymouth, Mass 1633; in Pequot war; surveyor of highways, m. Mary, dau Mathieu Del'Obel, physician to William of Orange and James 1, G.Dau of Jean Del'Obl, French lawyer.

      James Cole and Mary Tibbes are the 6th great grandparents of Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

      Birth

      Date: 25 JUL 1600
      Place: Highgate, London, England[5]
      Christening: 25 JUL 1600 St Giles, Cripplegate, London, England
      Marriage

      Date: 1 MAY 1625
      Place: Highgate, London, England[6]
      James & Mary [LOVEL/deLOVEL?/LOBEL?] (-1660); ca 1623/25?, by 1628, Plymouth/ Duxbury/Middleborough/Swansea
      {Roosevelt Anc. 86; Bartlett (1925) 6; Hale (1952) 525; Plymouth 67; Duxbury 247; Swansea 154, 627; Almy 22; Clark (,9) 42; Guild Anc. 29; Sv. 1:427; Shurtleff 1:154; Cole 21; Cole (1887) 58; NYGBR 45:3; MD 27:41}
      U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900
      Source number: 1437.000; Source type: Electronic Database; Number of Pages: 1; Submitter Code: DPS.
      Birth Place: MI
      Birth Year: 1600
      Spouse Name: Mary Lobel
      Spouse Birth Year: 1604
      Marriage Year: 1624
      Death

      Date: AFT OCT 1678
      Place: Plymouth, MA[7]
      Discrepancy in death place. Could be Swansea, Bristol County, Massachusetts. Discrepancy in death year. Could be 1690.
      Sources

      Robert C. Anderson. The Great Migration Begins. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1995.
      Robert C. Anderson. The Pilgrim Migration. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2004.
      John O. Austin. Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island. Albany, 1887. Reprint. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1969.
      Janet K. Pease and Robert S.Wakefield. ?Additions to the Family of Hugh2 Cole (ca.1627?1699) of Swansea, Mass.?The American Genealogist 64(1989): 139?141.
      Robert S. Wakefield and Alice H. Dreger. ?The Wives and Children of James2 Cole (circa 1625?1709) of Plymouth, Massachusetts.? The American Genealogist 67(1982): 243?45.
      Savage, James. A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England (Boston, Little, Brown and Company, 1862) Volume #1, Pgs 416 - 429
      COLE, JAMES, Plymouth 1633, first occup. of the little hill, where the early pilgrims had been bur. was that yr. at Saco, perhaps, as in Haz. Coll. I. 326, or Folsom, 33, 125; by w. Mary, had James; Hugh, b. a 1632, bef. ment.; John; Mary, wh. m. John my. He kept an inn from 1638 to 1660, and he was liv. in 1688, very aged.
      Cole, Ernest Byron The descendants of James Cole of Plymouth 1633 (New York: Grafton Press, 1908)
      Some of the information about James Cole, Hugh Cole, John Cole 1 & 2 (m. Abigail Butts) is taken from this book.
      It is a possibility that James Cole was married to a MARY TIBBES (Not Mary Lobel) as stated in this book.
      Torrey, Clarence Almon. Torrey?s New England Marriages Prior to 1700 (Baltimore Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Seventh Printing 2004)
      http://www.arq.net/~ljacobs/cole.html
      http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=34205577 Extensive biography.
      Source: S197 Marie Harrington, Benton, ME 04901.
      http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/g/r/e/B-Grebles/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0460.html
      http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=12412895&pid=549
      References

      ? http://www.plimoth.org/media/pdf/cole_james.pdf references GMB and http://www.PlymouthAncestors.org
      ? Although some published accounts of his arrival in the colonies place him first in Saco, Maine, later published records show that a different James Cole most probably settled in Saco, Maine.
      ? "List of Freemen of Massachusetts, 1630-1691" by Lucius R. Paige, Phx Libr 929.374 p152c
      ? The Descendants of James Cole of Plymouth - by Ernest Byron Cole 1908
      ? Source: #S197
      ? Source: #S197
      ? Source: #S197
      Acknowledgements

      Cole-661 created through the import of grant2.ged on 07 February 2011.
      Cole-2508 created through the import of mike_walton_2011.ged on Aug 20, 2011 by Mike Walton.
      Cole-2794 created through the import of Putnam2-1_2010-01-02_2011-02-16_2011-10-11.ged on Oct 12, 2011 by John Putnam.
      Cole-2827 created through the import of Crystal_s Family Tree (2).ged on Oct 17, 2011 by Crystal Hatch.
      Cole-3554 created through the import of Thompson Family Tree.ged on Sep 1, 2012 by Wilson Thompson.
      Deborah King, firsthand knowledge. He must be very old.
    Person ID  I381  Morrows: Lige and Mildred
    Last Modified  16 Jan 2015 


 
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